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Southern Health leading global study into the psychological impact of Coronavirus

27 November 2020
Southern Health leading global study into the psychological impact of Coronavirus

Following a highly successful first phase which saw over 41,000 participants, researchers from Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust and their collaboration group are launching the second phase of their global study into the psychological impact of the Coronavirus pandemic and lockdown. 

The study, which is available online here and open to anyone over 16, If you completed it in the first phase you can take it again this time as well as it is important to understand how people have adapted or changed. We would encourage everyone, including staff, patients, friends and family to take part.

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Prof Shanaya Rathod, Consultant Psychiatrist & Director of Research at Southern Health said:

“The global impact of COVID 19 will be felt by us for a long time. Our study aims to investigate the psychological impact of COVID 19 on general population, healthcare workers, patients with COVID and individuals with vulnerabilities.”

Phase one data gave valuable insights in to how different people, genders and communities were coping with the global pandemic. This second phase enables more people to take part, ensuring an even greater range of data for clinicians to use to improve the way they support people during these difficult times. 

the Trust is encouraging anyone who hasn’t already, to take part in this second round. If you took part the first time you can take part again as your feelings, coping strategies and personal circumstances will all have changed and this in itself will be important data to help us understand the psychological impact of COVID 19 within the general population, healthcare workers, patients with COVID and individuals with vulnerabilities.

As the country struggles through a second lockdown, despite months of efforts to remain safe through social distancing measures, isolation and strict guidelines, continuing to studying how people are  reacting and coping plays an important part in shaping how the NHS responds.

The study is linked to the Medical Research Council global health research programme led by the Portsmouth-Brawijaya Centre for Global Health, Population, and Policy, University of Portsmouth, the study involves a whole range of partners across the NHS. This includes local colleagues from Portsmouth Hospitals, University Hospital Southampton, Solent NHS Trust and Hampshire Hospitals. Mirroring the truly global scale of the pandemic, the study is also being shared by partners across the world, including, Canada, India, Greece, Singapore and Holland amongst others. The study aims to not only look at how the virus has impacted on our own mental health across the UK but then compare it to others from different countries.  

Professor Rathod added: “The global platform and use of validated questionnaires allows the study to assess the wider impact of culture, political landscapes and impact of different responses in different countries. As a result we will be able to understand and strengthen our ongoing responses and those for any future crisis.”

With Over 55 sites across the UK and dozens across the globe either already running the survey, in the process of setting it up, or expressing their interest, it is hoped the study will provide researchers and the NHS with much wider view of how the pandemic has affected people. This data can then be used to adapt and improve our responses to future crisis, allowing a more personalised approach to psychological support.     

For more information on Southern Health’s Research Department please visit: www.southernhealth.nhs/research 

You can take the survey by following this link: https://southernhealthnhs.fra1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8H6lIPRGKm4kp93 

 

Notes:

The study has been fully ethically approved by the Health Research Authority.

The study is linked to the Medical Research Councils global health research programme (MR/N006267/1) which is led by the Portsmouth-Brawijaya Centre for Global Health, Population, and Policy, University of Portsmouth. 

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