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Our studies

MARC conduct a range of clinical trials into dementia, mild cognitive impairment and memory problems with the aim to better understand how to diagnose, treat, cure and prevent dementia.

If you are interested in participating in our current trials, please contact us.

If you do not believe you would be appropriate for one of our current trials, you can still contact us to learn more about our upcoming trials.

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JULIUS Study - Tablet medication for people with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease

This treatment hopes to slow the worsening of the illness, whilst aiming to assess the effects of a new drug on biomarkers including tau for people with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's Disease.

For more information or to register your interest to take part:

Please email the Study Coordinator Annette Stevens:

Annette.stevens@southernhealth.nhs.uk

 

Inclusion criteria

Mild Cognitive Impairment

Alzheimer's Disease

ANAVEX Study - Tablet medication for people Alzheimer's disease 

This treatment aims to improve mental activities that are involved in learning, remembering and using general daily knowledge. The drug may protect the brain neurons (brain nerve cells) that are usually damaged in Alzheimer’s disease.

For more information or to register your interest to take part:

Please email the Study Coordinator Lena Abzel-Jackson:

Lena.abzel-Jackson@southernhealth.nhs.uk

 

Inclusion criteria

Mild Cognitive Impairment

Alzheimer's Disease


AVANIR Study - Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease, tablet medication for people Alzheimer's disease 

This study aims to reduce symptoms of agitation in people with Alzheimer's Disease.

Agitation symptoms can be very distressing for the person with dementia but also for their family members. This drug has the potentially to reduce agitation and therefore some of the distress associated with agitation.

For more information or to register your interest to take part:

Please email the Study Coordinator Suzanne Dodge:

Suzanne.dodge@southernhealth.nhs.uk

 

 Inclusion criteria

Alzheimer's Disease

Agitation

 

PRINCIPLE Study

Aims to find low-risk treatments for older people with COVID-19 that can be taken at home.

To be eligible to join the trial you will need to have experienced symptoms that are likely to be caused by COVID-19 for fewer than 15 days.

The trial is open to people aged 65 or over, or aged 50–64 with an underlying health condition.

For more information please go to: https://www.principletrial.org/

Please note If you are registered to the following GP practices:

Brune Medical Practice,

Forton Medical Centre,

Stoke Road Medical Centre,

Waterside Medical Centre

And would like to get involved please contact Study Coordinator Claire Firth:

Claire.firth@southernhealth.nhs.uk

Inclusion criteria

Aged 65+ and one the following 3 symptoms:

- A new continuous cough

- Or a high temperature

- Or a loss of, or change in, normal sense of smell

 

OR aged 50 to 64,  with an underlying health condition

 And one the following 3 symptoms:

- A new continuous cough

- Or a high temperature

- Or a loss of, or change in, normal sense of smell

 

The Navigation Study - Personalised cues and way finding in early to moderate Alzheimers Disease

In this study, we are looking at how personalised cues could help people living with Alzheimers Disease learn and navigate new environments.

For more information or to register your interest to take part please email the MARC team: SHFT.MARC@NHS.NET    

Inclusion Criteria 

Alzheimers Disease

 

Clive's Corner

MARC is proud to be home and host of Professor Clive Holmes (Director of Academic Research at MARC). Professor Holmes is one of the leading researchers in Alzheimer's Disease worldwide and is at the forefront of progress in dementia research.
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Professor Clive Holmes

The RhEumatoidarthritiS, medIcation and memory STudy (RESIST)

Two distinctive features of the brains of people suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease are amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Alongside these changes there is also evidence that inflammation is occurring in the brain (neuroinflammation).
There is increasing evidence that neuroinflammation contributes as much to the disease progression of Alzheimer’s Disease as do the plaques and tangles themselves. A modest increase in the level of a protein in the blood that promotes inflammation: tumour necrosis factor –alpha (TNF-α) has been found to be associated with increased memory decline in people with Alzheimer’s Disease.
TNF-α inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic inflammatory arthritis. TNF-α inhibitors are used to reduce the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and to reduce joint damage in people with moderate to severe disease. They are usually prescribed when traditional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) such as methotrexate do not work. TNF-α inhibitors: etanercept, adalimumab, certolizumabpegol, infliximab and golimumab inhibit the action of TNF, thus suppressing inflammation.
There is a growing evidence base which suggests these drugs may be important in the treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease.  A small study has shown that patients taking TNF-α inhibitor drugs for rheumatoid arthritis may be protected against the development of Alzheimer’s Disease by as much as 60%. A small randomised double-blind study of a TNF-α inhibitor (etanercept) showed significant evidence of a slowing down of cognitive decline after regular injections under the skin. This suggests that inhibition of this protein may be an approach to Alzheimer’s Disease treatment.
We have assessed data from the British Society of Rheumatology Biologics Registry-Rheumatoid Arthritis (BSRBR-RA). This registry contains data on 19,000 patients with rheumatoid arthritis on a biologic drug. Those on a TNF-α inhibitor were compared to those on a traditional DMARD. Rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with TNF-α inhibitors appeared to have a lower incidence of dementia compared to traditional DMARD patients.
As a result of this preliminary evidence we are carrying out a comprehensive study, funded by the Alzheimer’s Society, of rheumatoid arthritis patients on TNF-α inhibitors who have early memory problems and following their memory function over 18 months and comparing how well they do with a group of rheumatoid arthritis patients with memory problems who are on traditional DMARDs.
If TNF-α inhibitors are found to reduce the rate of cognitive decline in participants with rheumatoid arthritis who have early memory problems this would give enough evidence for a definitive randomised controlled trial of TNF-α inhibitors in people at risk of dementia.
Participants are now being recruited from rheumatology out-patient clinics in Belfast and Southampton.
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