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World Mental Health Day - Wednesday 10 October 2018

5.10.2018
World Mental Health Day is an opportunity to raise awareness of mental health issues, and the struggles people face with their own mental health. This day also gives us a chance to stop and look at our own mental wellbeing. 
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Southern Health will be holding an event on World Mental Health Day to celebrate the support that comes with peer workers.

Peer workers are living examples of recovery, hope and positive wellbeing, despite adversity. Because of this, organisations from across the peer support field are coming together to share their achievements and celebrate the amazing things that happen when the mental health community comes together.      

Wednesday 10 October
 9.30am-5.00pm
  The Millennium Third Age Centre (3AC)
 11 Cranbury Terrace
 Southampton, SO14 0LH

 Come along and enjoy...

  • Peer Support Toolkit workshop by Mind

  • Award winning play "My Life Closed Twice" by Gauntlet Theatre

  • Features from The Excited Orange Arts and Film Festival

  • Performances from local choirs

  • Plus talks from peer workers, family/carer peer workers, Southern Health staff and more!

  

All are welcome, entry is free and includes refreshments and a buffet lunch!

To book your place, click here.
 



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This World Mental Health Day staff and patients at Parklands Hospital will be ‘yarn bombing’ the front of the specialist mental health unit. As well as the therapeutic benefits of the activity, all knitted and crocheted contributions will be later re-purposed to create blankets for homeless people in the Basingstoke area.

Staff, patients and family carers at the hospital’s adult mental health ward ‘Hawthorns’, have been busy making crocheted and knitted shapes and pompoms to ‘yarn bomb’ trees and the front of the building in what will be a very bright and exciting art installation.

The installation is due to launch on Wednesday 10 October at 10.30am and will remain in situ for a few weeks. The items will be taken down, washed and used to make blankets for the homeless in Basingstoke and the pompoms used to decorate the hospital ward’s Christmas tree.



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As part of World Mental Health Day, Southern Health is launching a new service called the ‘Recolo Project’ for people who are experiencing obsessive or fixated thoughts and behaviours about others, impacting upon their own lives and the lives of others.  

‘Recolo’ is a Latin word, which means to renew or to think again, and the new service aims to work with people to make positive behavioural changes - improving their psychological wellbeing, their relationships with other people and ultimately reducing the risks of unlawful stalking behaviour and the impact of this on potential victims.

The community-based project is a multi-disciplinary service, with a consultant forensic psychiatrist, a clinical psychologist, a forensic psychologist, an occupational therapist and a team administrator. The team works collaboratively alongside Hampshire Constabulary, Hampshire & IOW probation teams and Aurora New Dawn (a victim advocacy organisation) as part of a Multi-Agency Stalking Intervention Programme (MASIP).

The Recolo Project is one of three services within MASIP – the other two being victim advocacy and the Hampshire Stalking Clinic, which provides victim perspective and mental healthcare advice to police officers and other agencies investigating and managing stalking related crimes.

Dr Kirsty Butcher, clinical lead for the new mental health service, explains: “The Recolo Project is a really exciting new service that can help people in a number of ways, from initial assessment to a range of psychological and occupational therapies. Our team will also advise individuals about other services and support available to them. The end goal is changing negative and sometimes harmful behaviours, which will improve both their lives and importantly those of the people they’ve become fixated with.”